2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

on Saturday, 18 January 2020. Posted in Homilies

2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Saints are men and women who, at different moments in history, have lived lives of faith and are held up before us now as examples of how we might do the same. Each of them embodies a different aspect of what it means to be a disciple of Jesus, and today the liturgy invites us to look more closely at one of them, John the Baptist.

Few have had as close a relationship with the historical Jesus as John had. Apart from the fact that they were cousins, John was the one who prepared the way for Jesus and baptized him in the River Jordan.

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

on Saturday, 16 November 2019. Posted in Homilies

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

The first reading last week was about the seven brothers who accepted death rather than eat pig’s flesh. It was one of a series of heroic stories in the book of Maccabees designed to encourage the people in the middle of the second century BC to remain faithful to their own traditions when an attempt was being made to force Greek culture on them. Many faced violent persecution and some died for what they believed, raising  an interesting question for us which is how firm is our own belief in the great truths of our own tradition and how willing are we to, if not exactly die for them, at least stand up for them in a world which constantly dismisses out of hand anything to do with faith.

Christ the King

on Saturday, 23 November 2019. Posted in Homilies

Christ the King

I wonder how many of us would know the answer if I were to ask which of the four gospels we have been listening to during the last year. For some of us it may be a question that has never crossed our minds. What difference does it make? Surely they are all saying the same thing, a case of when you’ve heard one you have heard them all. Well, they aren’t all saying the same thing. There are things in one gospel which are not in another and sometimes they contradict each other. Take Christmas for example. It’s  just four weeks away now and soon we will be reliving the same old familiar story we hear every year. But two of the gospels, Mark and John, say absolutely nothing about the birth of Jesus, while Luke and Matthew offer us two completely different versions of the story.

The Presentation of the Lord

on Saturday, 01 February 2020. Posted in Homilies

The Presentation of the Lord

It’s not often that I give a homily on the Feast of the Presentation. In fact I don’t remember ever having done it before. It’s just that today is the Second of February, forty days after Christmas, when St Luke tells us the parents of Jesus took him to the Temple to present him to the Lord as laid down by the Law of Moses. Christmas is a distant memory now, but, until we have celebrated today’s, the story is not complete, something that was brought home to me last week in Lytham where both the town square and the church next door still had their cribs up until after this weekend. So what is there in the story of the Presentation that has something of relevance to say to us today?

 

 

 

15th Sunday Homily

on Sunday, 17 July 2016. Posted in Homilies

15th Sunday Homily

 

The wonderful thing about a good story is the  variety of ways in which it can be interpreted. That’s why Jesus speaks  in parables. Parables are mirrors into which we are invited to gaze until we begin to see there a reflection of ourselves.